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Moment thé

Ce matin, il fait gris et froid. La nuit avec un bébé de quelques mois a été courte. Les grands sont à l'école, j'ai besoin d'un moment thé pour trouver la motivation à me mettre au travail... Préparer son thé, pour moi, c'est toute une démarche. Chercher une tasse, choisir une théière ou un gaïwan, associer un pot de réserve, et préparer un plateau. Choisir mon thé, le peser, chauffer l'eau. Créer une ambiance propice au thé et à la saison m'aide à me plonger dans ce moment revitailsant... Aujourd'hui, j'ai choisi un Yancha de notre sélection d'hiver: le RouGui de notre ami producteur Li. Les gestes pour le préparer, le thé lui-même, l'ambiance douce et chaleureuse que j'ai créé...

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Lapsang Souchong and ZhengShan XiaoZhong

Black teas were inadvertently invented in China in the 17th century in a valley of the WuYi Mountains, the Tong Mu Guan valley.One spring, when a troop of mercenaries passed by, the peasants got scared and took refuge in the mountains, leaving their harvest of the day behind them. On their return, they found their leaves soiled and oxidized. In order not to lose the harvest, they decided to smoke these leaves with spruce wood and sold them at a discount to European merchants. The Europeans appreciated this new tea and asked for more. Thus was born the tea called Laaph Sang Su Chong in Cantonese. Lapsang Souchong which soon became a world reference and paved the way for great...

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Qimen: Selecting raw leaves, grading and quality

Qimen are one of those teas that Arnaud and I are really keen on. These are teas that we prepare regularly for a tasty breakfast or a tea break in the afternoon.A century and a half ago, they conquered the West and supplanted Fujian black teas for a good reason: their delicacy appealed to the English and the Dutch... Yet today, in the Western world, Qimen is more synonymous with Blend for breakfast, or even simply teabags. Indeed, unfortunately, we have generally only access to very low quality Qimen, mass produced in summer and fall when productivity is the most important.Today, in China, more and more producers are questioning this productivist logic and are moving towards the production of quality...

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Dancong: Taste of the North against taste of the South

Following recent discussions with tea friends on the Dancongs and their aging, I undug from my storage one of my old Dancongs, a little Ba Xian from 2015, the first tea bought from my friend who produced it in Lingtou. It was precisely while looking for this tea that I met my friend Zhang. It must be said that in Shanghai, finding Dancongs in a tea house is quite exceptional, so I had directly contacted various producers through Chinese social networks. I have a little soft spot for Ba Xian, one of those complex teas that have always amazed me, both the real Dancong and their clones exported to Taiwan. If I look back to my history with the Dancongs,...

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